Publication on African American autistic children

A paper in Perspectives Special Interest Group 1 – Language Learning and Education for the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association was co-authored by Dr. Hamilton with colleagues Drs. Jamie Pearson and Hedda Meadan. The paper explores ways for professionals to engage in culturally responsive partnerships with African American autistic children and their families. Check out “We…

Dr. Hamilton to co-present @ AERA ~ Teachers and SLPs working together to advocate for AAE-speakers ~

Dr. Hamilton and colleagues, Drs. Simone Gibson and Ebony Terrell Shockley, will present on Reconceptualizing the Roles of Speech and Language Pathologists Regarding African American English in K-12 Schools.  This roundtable discussion will address ways that SLPs can inform teachers about the linguistic features of African American English and become advocates for African American English-speaking students. Come…

“Choosing Civility” with Cecil County Public Library

On February 18th, Dr. Hamilton presented a workshop entitled “Cultural Competencies and Language” to ~100 Cecil County Public Library (CCPL) staff on Staff Day. The workshop encompassed the theme “Choose Civility” to align with CCPL’s Choose Civility Initiative. This initiative is based on the book Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct by P.M. Forni. Dr. Hamilton aligned her…

Dr. Hamilton to present on “Choosing Civility” for CCPL

Dr. Hamilton will present her workshop entitled “Cultural Competencies and Language” to Cecil County Public Library (CCPL) staff on Staff Day. This time her workshop will encompass the theme “Choose Civility” to align with CCPL’s Choose Civility Initiative. This initiative is based on the book Choosing Civility: The Twenty-five Rules of Considerate Conduct by P.M. Forni. Dr. Hamilton will…

Publication on African American English

Check out Dr. Hamilton’s most recent paper, with co-authors Eusabia Mont and Cameron McLain.  If you think that African American English-speakers use improper grammar or  leave off ‘ed’ when using the past tense, think again! Deletion, Omission, Reduction: Redefining the Language We Use to Talk About African American English